Geri Anasayfa

Detay


LOCAL POLITICAL POWER IN THE EUPHRATES RIVER BASIN IN THE LIGHT OF CUNEIFORM SCRIPTS: MELID KINGDOM

Abstract
As a result of the turmoil in the Anatolian geography, local political forces emerged in the Eastern and South Eastern Anatolia Regions as well as in the Eastern Mediterranean Region and Northern Syria as the Hittites went out of the existence. These local political powers, known as “Late Hittite Principalities” or “Late Hittite Kingdoms”, became the significant actors leading the military, political and economic events in Anatolia and Northern Syria in the Iron Age. The data about the Kingdom of Melid, which was one of these local powers, were obtained from the records of the Assyrian and Urartian kings, who arranged flights to the region, as well as hieroglyphic inscriptions captured in the region. According to the abovementioned sources, Melid played an active role in directing the policies in the region with its raw material resources and location. Melid Kingdom which develops by being set up in Malatya geograph described as west of Eastern Anatolia during its history, has consistently to develop to military, political and economic relationships with Assyrian and Urartian kingdom which are two significant military and political power in the near east geography. Therefore, the raw material sources of Melid Kingdom and its strategic location lead to realize to the dissemination activities towards that religion of like Assyrian and Urartian kingdom which are two significant power in the Near East geography. The almost all of the kings who manage to the country of Melid, get rid of these problems and has to pay tax to Assyrian and Urartian kingdom in order to continue their existences. In addition to political and military issues, in the Iron Age, the Kingdom of Melid also made a significant contribution to shaping the social and cultural life in Malatya and its surroundings, defined as the west of Eastern Anatolia.

Keywords
Hittites, Melid Kingdom, Urartu, Assyrian, Raw Materials Sources